Leslie C. Griffin

William S. Boyd Professor of Law
 
Phone: (702) 895-2071
Education:
B.A., summa cum laude, University of Notre Dame
M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University (Religious Studies)
J.D., Stanford Law School

Dr. Leslie C. Griffin is the William S. Boyd Professor of Law at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law. Professor Griffin, who teaches constitutional law, is known for her interdisciplinary work in law and religion. She holds a Ph.D. in Religious Studies from Yale University and a J.D. from Stanford Law School. She is author of the Foundation Press casebook, Law and Religion: Cases and Materials, editor of Law and Religion: Cases in Context, and author of numerous articles and book chapters about law, religion, politics and ethics. Her most recent law review article, The Sins of Hosanna-Tabor, appeared in the Indiana Law Journal, 88 Ind. L.J. 981 (2013).

Other publications include How Smith Protects Women’s Equality, 32 Cardozo L. Rev. 1831 (2011); Religion and the Courts 1790-1947, in Cambridge History of Religions In America (S. J. Stein, ed., 2012); Fighting the New Wars of Religion: The Need for a Tolerant First Amendment, 62 Maine L. Rev. 23 (2010) and Good Catholics Should Be Rawlsian Liberals, 5 Southern Cal. Interdisc. L.J. 297 (1997).

Before becoming a law professor, Professor Griffin clerked for the Honorable Mary M. Schroeder of the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals and was an assistant counsel in the Department of Justice's Office of Professional Responsibility, which investigates professional misconduct by federal prosecutors.

Before joining the UNLV faculty, Professor Griffin held the Larry & Joanne Doherty Chair in Legal Ethics at the University of Houston Law Center and was a tenured member of the faculty at the Santa Clara University School of Law. Professor Griffin has held research fellowships at the Harvard Program in Ethics and the Professions and Emory University. She has been a visiting professor at the George Washington University Law School, the University of Alabama School of Law, and Georgetown University Law Center.