Our Clinics

In the Thomas & Mack Legal Clinic, law students gain practical legal experience representing clients. By design, the Clinic functions as a laboratory for justice. Through training, advocacy, scholarship, and community partnerships, we strive to serve the community and improve the law and law practice.

In the clinic, law students take the lead in handling all aspects of client representation.  These responsibilities include developing and maintaining the attorney-client relationship, strategic planning, fact investigation, legal research, drafting and filing documents, and appearing in court.

The Clinic offers seven clinics in regular rotation:

  • Appellate Clinic  

    Students in the Appellate Clinic work on federal appeals before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals or state appeals before the Nevada Supreme Court. These cases include direct criminal appeals and civil appeals. Students digest the case record, interview and counsel their clients about the possible issues to include in the appeal, identify and develop factual and legal issues for appeal, file briefs and argue cases in the appellate courts.

    Professor Anne Traum

  • Small Business & Nonprofit Legal Clinic  

    The Small Business & Nonprofit Legal Clinic provides representation to nonprofit organizations, small businesses, and entrepreneurs in transactional matters. Under the close supervision of licensed attorneys, law students assist clients in forming businesses or nonprofit organizations; reviewing and negotiating contracts; assisting nonprofit organizations with tax-exempt applications and maintenance of tax-exempt status; working with federal, state, and local government agencies; and providing advice concerning intellectual property issues.

    If you would like to apply for legal services, please complete the Request for Legal Services Form here.

    Professor Eric Franklin

  • Education Advocacy Clinic  
    Students in the Education Advocacy Clinic work with graduate students from School of Education’s Educational Psychology Department to advocate for the educational rights of children with disabilities in the public school system. Students also have the opportunity to participate in the law school’s innovative Kids’ Court School, which educates child witnesses in Clark County court cases about the judicial process in order to reduce their system-induced stress. The clinic helps law students learn to work collaboratively with professionals in other disciplines, to advocate effectively in school disciplinary and other administrative proceedings, and to utilize research from other disciplines to develop best practices for interviewing child clients and witnesses.
    Credits: 6. Graded.

    Professor Rebecca Nathanson

  • Family Justice Clinic  
    Students in the Family Justice Clinic provide a broad range of family law representation to low-income clients for whom access to justice is limited. Students represent children, parents or guardians in family cases including custody and visitation, guardianship, domestic violence and other family matters. Cases may involve contested trials, negotiations, administrative advocacy, and cutting edge legal and policy issues. The clinic has a particular focus on prisoners and their families, clients engaged with immigration issues, and those affected by the child welfare system and other forms of state intervention. The clinic explores the role of families in society, the strengths and weaknesses of state intervention into families, and the meaning of access to justice for children and parents.
    Credits: 6. Graded.

    Professor Elizabeth MacDowell

  • Immigration  
    Students in the Immigration Clinic engage with immigrant communities through direct client representation and policy advocacy for vulnerable populations that are otherwise unable to obtain legal representation. Students may represent clients in administrative proceedings, Immigration Court, and federal and state courts. Some students may work in appellate and amici capacities, while others may engage in regulatory and legislative reform efforts. The clinic is purposefully diverse, exposing students to the broad reach of immigration law into a vast array of legal systems and social institutions. Immigration law presents unparalleled complexities and rich client interactions. In problem solving with their clients, students are challenged to integrate demanding legal analysis with sophisticated community advocacy.
    Credits: 6. Graded.

    Professor Fatma Marouf

    Professor Michael Kagan

  • Juvenile Justice  
    Students in the Juvenile Justice Clinic represent children who have been charged in juvenile delinquency proceedings. Law students negotiate with district attorneys, conduct contested hearings or trials, and advocate for proper dispositions and sentences. As part of their clinic work, students also have the opportunity to shadow Juvenile Public Defenders and observe all aspects of their work in Juvenile Court. This clinic focuses on the meaning and importance of developing an attorney-client relationship, explores the role of juvenile defense attorneys as adversarial counsel in the context of a problem-solving court, and examines the history, policy and interrelationship of the systems that affect children accused of criminal behavior.

    Credits: 6. Graded.

    Professor Mary Berkheiser

  • Mediation  
    Students in the Mediation Clinic receive intensive mediation training and then mediate real legal disputes. This clinical experience will introduce you to the process of mediation, the neutral facilitation of negotiation between disputing or transacting parties. You will study theories of conflict, mediation, and negotiation, learn the skills used in the mediation process, from the perspective of mediators, parties, and their representatives, and also learn about legal regimes that regulate mediation and mediators. You will be mediating family disputes at Clark County’s Family Division and small claims cases at the Neighborhood Justice Center. In these real-world settings you will hone your skills as a mediator and have opportunities to reflect on the experience and receive feedback. The theory part of this course includes seminar readings, short exercises, role-plays, and simulations. You will be evaluated on your proficiency as a mediator during live mediations and in a video-taped mediation simulation as well as weekly writing assignments. In addition, you and your colleagues in the Clinic will work on a variety of community-based projects in partnership with institutional mediation providers in Las Vegas and around the state. Students earn six credits for this course and, after completing a 40-hour, mandatory pre-semester mediation training, are expected to commit an average of 15 hours per week on seminar and Clinic-related activity. Students in the Mediation Clinic will be certified to practice law in Nevada under limited practice Rule 49.5. There is no final exam.
    Credits: 6. Graded.

    Professor Lydia Nussbaum

     

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