Lawyering in Context

Helping students go beyond the expected ...

At the UNLV William S. Boyd School of Law, the three-semester lawyering process curriculum challenges students to exceed their own expectations. From the start, students are immersed in theory and practice as we help them learn lawyering skills as well as critical problem solving and rhetorical theory and application.


How did our faculty spend the pandemic?

Here at Boyd, we’ve been teaching remotely, missing our time together and with our students, and learning lots about how to Zoom. We’re waiting for Joe to figure out how to have us all hologrammed into one place. In the meantime, we chat when we can and daydream about when we can conspire again (NB: the etymology of “conspire” is “to breathe with ...”). We’ve also tried to do a few other things:

 

Mary Beth Beazley
Professor of Law

Mary Beth has been finishing up a persuasive legal writing book for Aspen – called Briefs and Beyond – that she is co-authoring with Monte Smith of Ohio State. She is also in the throes of page proofs for a Gender Equity Symposium in the Villanova Law Review. The article is called “Shouting into the wind: How the ABA standards promote inequality in legal education, and what law students and faculty should do about it.” (We’re guessing you know why the title has that “shouting into the wind” part.) She did a virtual presentation for LWI, and will be participating in the critiquing workshop in December. She is also busy with her presentations for the National Judicial College, where she has been delighted to do some work with Sophie Sparrow of UNH Franklin Pierce and has been Webexing to various branches of The Department of Health and Human Services. For part of this semester, she lived in Ohio, Zooming from the nursery of her new baby grandson.

Return to Top


Lori Johnson
Associate Professor of Law

Lori has a side gig homeschooling two children, but she’s also working on a few other things. She recently published Navigating Technology Competence in Transactional Practice in the Villanova Law Review, and (with Melissa Love Koenig at Marquette) Walk the Line: Aristotle & the Ethics of Narrative, in the Nevada Law Journal. The article with Melissa was part of the Nevada Law Journal’s 2020 Symposium on Classical Rhetoric as a Lens for Contemporary Legal Praxis. The Symposium took place in the before times, and Lori co-chaired it with Northwestern’s Sue Provenzano and the Classical Rhetoric Working Group. She continues in her role as Book Review Editor for the Journal of the Legal Writing Institute, and serves as Secretary of the AALS Section on Legal Writing, Reasoning, and Research. She has been nominated as the Section’s Chair-Elect for 2021. Finally, she provided expert testimony on a Nevada professional responsibility issue before the Federal District Court for the District of Nevada. 

Return to Top


Joe Regalia
Associate Professor of Law

Besides his hologram project, Joe is currently occupying lots of space at the intersection of technology and law. He’s working on articles on analytical data and judges, and tech and insurance claims, and he’s recently published an article in the Kentucky Law Journal. Joe has been working (alone and with others) on (1) a (first annual?) Virtual Lawyering Boot Camp for our students, (2) an app to support virtual teaching, (3) a free legal career resources site (lawjobresources.com), and (4) an Undergrad law journal at UNLV, which he helped launch and is now advising.  He led an AALS webinar on tech in the law school classroom, and he’s working with Dyane O'Leary and Drew Simshaw on an AALS tech presentation coming in January. He has also been busy with presentations to the Department of Justice Civil Division, and a number of private and public legal employers. He continues his work on ALWD Committees, on Perspectives, and as an editor for LC&RJoe Regalia

Return to Top


Rebecca Scharf
Professor of Law

What are you working on?
Rebecca is serving her last two years as a member of the Legal Writing Institute Board of Directors after six years on the Board. She has served for two years on the Board’s Executive Committee. She is also serving as a member of the AALS Section on Leadership and as the Co-Chair of the AALS Section on Balance and the Legal Profession's Other Programming Committee.  In addition to legal writing, she teaches and writes in the area of Privacy Law.  She is currently writing an article on privacy concerns involving the use of drones during the pandemic and has conducted a peer review of an article on Drones and Privacy for the New South Wales Law Journal. In her spare time, she worries that she is not being productive enough during Covid and that her daughter will never graduate from middle school after a year of on-line “learning.”

Return to Top


Kathryn M. Stanchi
Professor of Law

Kathy has been working on the Ninth Edition of Legal Reasoning and Legal Writing, which has allowed her to keep in touch with her friends Ellie Margolis and Richard Neumann. She's quite proud that the book will now address the singular “they” in the style chapter. She's also been toiling away on her new article The Rhetoric of Racism in the United States Supreme Court, which examines how SCOTUS has contributed to the evolving definition of racism. It is forthcoming in the Boston College Law Review. She’s also been busy plotting the Feminist Judgments takeover of the world by putting out more volumes in the Feminist Judgments series with Bridget Crawford and Linda Berger. Newly-published volumes are Family Law (Rachel Rebouche) and Reproductive Justice (Kim Mutcherson), with Torts, Property Law, Health Law and Corporations on the way!

Return to Top